Who’s Looking Out For The Little Missouri State Scenic River – Redux

I’ve given some more thought to the issue of Little Missouri River water permits since I last wrote about it on May 3.

I reported then that Gov. Doug  Burgum had signed into law an amendment to the Little Missouri State Scenic River Act, making industrial use of Little Missouri water legal for the first time since the Act was passed in 1975. But at the same time he sent word over to the State Water Commission, which issues water permits in our state, not to issue any of those permits in the upstream reaches of the river—between the North Dakota-South Dakota border and the Long-X Bridge at the north Unit of Theodore Roosevelt National Park.

Quick geography lesson for those not familiar with the Little Missouri: It rises in the hills north of Devils Tower in Wyoming and flows north through Montana and South Dakota, entering North Dakota in the extreme southwest part of the state, and flows north and east into Lake Sakakawea east of Killdeer. Carving the North Dakota Bad Lands, home to Theodore Roosevelt National Park, along the way.

It’s that stretch between the North Unit of the National Park and the big lake that Burgum has left open for industrial development. It’s no coincidence that the focus of oil development along the river is along that stretch.

That’s his concession to the oil industry. In fact, his own Water Commission staff admitted to a reporter for The Dickinson Press the other day that “That’s where most of the oil industry activity has been.” Commission engineer Jon Patch said “They’ve been using local supplies that then pipe the water to nearby wells that are ready to be fracked.”

Using that water illegally, until now, it should be pointed out. There’s still the issue of those 600 permits that were granted by Patch and his staff, illegally, over the past ten years or so. It appears that nothing is going to be done about that. As far as the state is concerned, that’s water under the bridge, so to speak.

I asked the Governor’s spokesman, Mike Nowatzki, if there were going to be any repercussions for the non-compliance with state law by the Water Commission staff. You’ll recall from an earlier story I wrote, the staff said they were “unaware” of the law that prohibited them from issuing industrial water permits from the State Scenic River. I pointed out to Nowatzki that, generally, ignorance of the law is no excuse.

Nowatzki wrote back “As for the “non-compliance” issue, I’m not aware of any related legal actions/proceedings and I’m unable to provide any legal opinions.”

Well, he’s right, but there is someone who can provide legal opinions—the Attorney General. So I fired off an e-mail to Liz Brocker, Wayne Stenehjem’s spokesperson: What is going to be done about the “non-compliance” with the law by the State Water Commission staff for the last ten years?”

Liz answered politely: “With regard to the questions . . . whether there is a criminal violation of a statute would be under the jurisdiction of the county state’s attorney who would make a determination based on the evidence following an investigation. The Water Commission is a state agency headed by the Governor, so any determination on whether further action is necessary or appropriate would properly need to be addressed there.”

Well, I thought her response was pretty nifty, in tossing the ball in two different directions: It’s the Governor’s job to determine if he wants to fire someone, and it’s the local state’s attorney who would have to investigate and file any charges for violating the law.

Nowatzki had sort of already indicated that the Governor was not interested in punishing the Water Commission staff. I thought about contacting the Burleigh County State’s Attorney and asking him if he was going to pursue this, but we’ve been in the middle of crime wave here since the oil boom began, and he has enough stuff on his plate right now without chasing after some doofus state employee who claims he didn’t know about the law that regulates his job.

I asked a former Water Commission staff member this week whether it was really possible that the engineers didn’t know they were breaking the law. The response was, yes, it’s possible. But it was also possible that they were operating under orders from above to help out the oil industry regardless of the law. Not much happened at the Water Commission during the Dalrymple years without clearance from the Governor’s office. One of the most important things the Governor could do to enable the oil boom was to make sure they had water for fracking. Without water, there’s no fracking. Without fracking, there’s no oil boom.

So that’s where things stand for now, at least as long as Doug Burgum is Governor. He has shown some concern for the Little Missouri State Scenic River, but has also accommodated the oil industry. We’ll keep an eye on the process. We’ll see how many industrial water permits get issued. And we’ll certainly ask anyone who decides to run for Governor in the future whether they’ll keep Burgum’s restrictions in place.

THE GOOD NEWS

Now, then I want to also revisit a piece of good news about the Little Missouri. Last December, just as the Governor was taking office, I took advantage of an old friendship with his new chief of staff (I think he calls her the CEO) Jodi Uecker, and urged her to ask her boss to please revive what I have always considered an important board, the Little Missouri Scenic River Commission. I had written a couple of blog pieces about it earlier last year, and placed articles in a couple of other publications I write for, and I shared those with her. You can read them here and here.

Well, Jodi listened. And her boss listened to her. And a couple weeks ago, he instructed the State Engineer, who heads the Water Commission staff, to do just that. It might take a while to get going. It has met only once since 2001 (only coincidentally, the year Ed Schafer, the last North Dakota Governor to give a rat’s ass about the Bad Lands and the Little Missouri, left office and turned the Governor’s office over to the Hoeven/Dalrymple administration).

The way it works is, as outlined in the Little Missouri Scenic River Act of 1975, Section 61-29 of the North Dakota Century Code, each County Commission in the six Bad Lands Counties appoints one member, who must be a rancher who owns property adjacent to the Little Missouri River, and those six serve with the State Engineer, the State Parks and Recreation Director, and the Director of the State Health Department on the nine-member Commission. The six ranchers elect a chairman from among their ranks, and the Parks Director serves as the recording secretary for the Commission.

Officially, it is the duty of the Chairman to call meetings, but unofficially, it has been the Parks Director who really gets it done (the current chairman, Alvin Nelson of Grassy Butte, has been dead for several years). I went on a search for meeting minutes about a year ago, and what I learned is that the only meeting held since 2001 was actually called in response to a request from the KLJ Engineering firm, to seek the Commission’s blessing for a proposed new river crossing in Billings County. That was August 29, 2007. Nearly ten years ago.

At that meeting, KLJ, working for the Billings County Commission (Medora is the county seat, in case you’re wondering where Billings County is) said as soon as it had prepared the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the project, it would get back in touch with the Commission to present its findings and seek permission to go ahead with the project.

Here are a couple excerpts from the meeting minutes:

“The specific purpose of requesting the meeting, KLJ noted, is to seek guidance from the Little Missouri Scenic River Commission, if the river crossing structure alternatives comply with the Little Missouri State Scenic River Act . . . KLJ concluded their presentation and asked whether any of these types of river crossings (low water crossings or bridges) would be in violation of the Little Missouri River Act.”

“The Commission noted as this project progresses and specific alternatives are recommended for both structure type and location, the Commission will need to be presented with detailed information fully addressing the scope and impact of this project to the Little Missouri River. Only then will the commission consider the project for compliance with NDCC 61-29.”

Well, how about that. Now, ten years later, after numerous delays, KLJ is just weeks, maybe days, away from releasing that EIS. And it is pretty obvious, from those minutes, that both the engineering firm and the State of North Dakota took the responsibility of the Commission pretty seriously back in 2007. I hope they still do.

KLJ will be coming looking for the Little Missouri Scenic River Commission to present it to. I hope the State Engineer, who has been tasked with reviving it, can get it done in time to weigh in on the project, because it has the potential to be the worst environmental disaster ever to hit the Bad Lands.

You see, there was no oil boom—not even a hint of an oil boom to come—back in 2007, so this was a pretty routine request. A new bridge for the ranchers and tourists to use. No one envisioned a miles-long caravan of trucks kicking up thousands of tons of dust a day, and scaring off every type of wildlife within eyesight and earshot, while using this crossing of the Little Missouri River to move their water, sand and oil.

So while Gov. Burgum is willing to sell off the northernmost portion of the river, which makes me nervous because it contains Little Missouri State Park, arguably the state’s most fragile and scenic park, which means we’re going to have to keep a close eye on water permit requests for that stretch of the river, he seems committed to offer some protection for the upstream parts of the river.

I hope he kicks the State Engineer in the ass and has him get this done right damn now. The oil industry, the Billings County Commission, and the bridges they want, wait for no man. The Little Missouri State Scenic River needs all the oversight it can get. That was the intent of the 1975 Legislature. I’ll report back when the EIS is released.

5 Responses

  1. Keith McKenna

    Good Afternoon. Almost 3 weeks ago, I hitched up my Teardrop Camper and towed it from Minneapolis to Medora/TRNP. Spent a couple of days and nights in the south unit, right next to the Missouri. It was so beautiful and serene. It was exactly what I vitally needed.
    Thank you for all of the time and effort you put in, to save this amazing corner of the world as it is. I cannot express my gratitude enough.
    It is blessed country, Keith.

  2. Joan

    Jim, Keep up the good work. We so totally need you! Wasn’t 2007 the year that the Bakken boom was predicted by the head of the ND Oil and Gas Division? Or perhaps it was a year or two later. Trying to help the institutional memory here.

    Also, you comment that Gov. Schafer is the last governor (2001) who cared about the Little Missouri and Medora. And Gov. Link (1980) was from rural Alexander (near Williston) and was protective of the environment. As you said, we will need to keep our eyes open on this, so the government knows we’re watching them. Good that the Dickinson Press is asking questions.

    Meanwhile in western Wisconsin, the frac sand industry has been hiring workers for the sand plants, according to the Eau Claire Leader Telegram 5/11/2017.

    1. Joan

      I found the information I was trying to remember: Lynn Helms, North Dakota chief oil and gas regulator, prepared a paper in 4/2008 predicting the wave of oil development that became the Bakken boom and ended a few years ago. A U.S. Geological Survey report also was released that month.

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